commerce
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“From the moment it launched five years ago, people have been using Pinterest to share things you can purchase. Today, the service is home to more than 50 billion pins, a figure that’s growing by 75% a year. But even though the social network was popular with shoppers from the start, you haven’t been able to actually buy stuff on Pinterest.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - Pinterest
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“Commerce has been on Twitter’s roadmap for a while now, but on Monday morning the company announced on its blog that it has finally taken the plunge. The team has begun rolling out “buy” buttons in posts to a small group of users to test the waters, with just under 30 merchants signed on at the outset.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - Twitter Testing Commerce
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“The startup’s impressive list of investors is betting that the app can solve the problems still plaguing mobile commerce.”

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Marc  Jacobs for Louis Vuitton

  1. Marc Jacobs Says Goodbye to Louis Vuitton at Paris Fashion Week
    This year one of the most talented designers in fashion, says goodbye to the LVMH power house; with 16 years of spectacular success we can’t wait to see what he does next.
  2. Fashion Site Refinery29 Raises $20 Million
    Refinery29, one of the most prominent Web properties pursuing the “content + commerce” meme, has raised a $20 million C round funded by Stripes Group.
  3. Nomi Raises $10 Million, Accel-Led Round to Bring Online Marketing Data to Offline Businesses
    The startup says that it wants to give brick-and-mortar stores and other offline businesses the data they need to become as optimized as an e-commerce website.
  4. The 5 Best Fashion Apps and Sites to Help you Organize your Closet
    Ever since we saw Cher Horowitz’s amazing virtual closet, we’ve craved something similar. And it turns out, our dream of a high-tech closet is closer than we think.

mager spotify

We may be the first Fashion Hackathon, but we’re also the first Hackathon for plenty of developers, designers and business and marketing professionals. What? how? why? do you do what? when? To answer some of the top questions, we talked to Spotify’s Hacker Advocate Andrew Mager, who’s been to more than 50 hackathons around the world.

What is the most challenging aspect of the Fashion Hackathon?
Getting people to understand that it’s more than fashion. It’s art, it’s e-commerce, it’s music, it’s retail.

What are your top 3 tips to first-time hackers?
Make friends early, network your ass off. Listen carefully to the API pitches to see what’s possible. And have fun; you’re building something in a short time that you aren’t getting paid for. You could be building the next big thing though, so don’t have too much fun!

What is the best way to form a team?
Network as soon as you walk in the door. Watch people as they watch the API demos to see which talks to interesting people. At the end of the API demos, stand up on the mic and say your skills and say what your idea is. Ask for help if you need it.

What are your top tips to experienced hackers who have never worked with fashion or retail tech?
Expand your horizons. A fashion hack is more than just nice clothes and runways. Even if you wear a nerdy black t-shirt everyday, there is a place for you at a fashion hackathon.

Andrew will meet with the Hackathon finalists for a mentorship session before they pitch at the Decoded Fashion Forum at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week. @mager