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“Natalie Massenet opened London Fashion Week this morning heralding the week as a time for digital innovation across the industry.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - London Fashion Week
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“Marc Jacobs has gone to great lengths to ensure that guests at his runway show tonight will feel right at home — albeit in someone else’s home. A 10,000-square-foot hot pink house was built (replete with a shocking pink carpet) and each attendee found a pair of Beats by Dre headphone tethered to their respective bleacher seats. While the show’s instrumental track could be heard by the naked ear, showgoers needed their headphones to fully immerse themselves in the experience once the models hit the runway.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - Marc Jacobs And Beats By Dre
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“Although Indonesia’s fashion ecommerce industry has a few players dominating the scene – like Zalora and Berrybenka – that still isn’t stopping former Rakuten Belanja Online director Tesong Kim from entering the battlefield. He launched flash sales site VIP Plaza back in February this year, and in only six months he has some figures to show off – like 42 percent repeat orders and 2.5 million monthly pageviews.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - VIP Plaza
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“Commerce has been on Twitter’s roadmap for a while now, but on Monday morning the company announced on its blog that it has finally taken the plunge. The team has begun rolling out “buy” buttons in posts to a small group of users to test the waters, with just under 30 merchants signed on at the outset.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - Twitter Testing Commerce
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“Thanks to a number of collaborations with fashion mavens such as Diane von Furstenberg and Tory Burch, stylish wristbands, smartwatches and even Google Glass are getting gorgeous upgrades.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - Fashionable Wearables

House of Holland and Metail

Henry Holland has come a long way since the days of selling his slogan t-shirts on MySpace (yes, we remember MySpace). This Fashion Week his eponymous fashion brand, House of Holland, have announced a tech first. Over the past few months he has been working with local fashion technology company, Metail, to come up with something quite different for the Spring/Summer 2015 show. For the first time consumers will be able to create their own ‘MeModel’, try on clothing from the catwalk in real time, and then pre-order in the right size.

So, how does it work? Head over to www.tryonHouseofHolland.com at 6.30pm on September 13th to watch in real time. Beneath the show video, you will find the collection as it would be on an e-commerce site. Click the ‘Try It On’ icon and the Metail widget will be revealed; in just 10 seconds you can input your height, weight and bra size and, voila, your personal ‘MeModel’ is revealed. As you check out different looks coming down the catwalk, you can update your MeModel by clicking the outfits you like. After the show, everyone who has registered their interest will have the option to purchase as soon as it’s produced.

This comes at an exciting time for London Fashion Week with the focus of the BFC being digital innovation. BFC Chief Executive Caroline Rush added, “This season London Fashion Week will be celebrating digital innovation in fashion, encouraging designers to embrace technology to amplify their stories and their work. House of Holland’s collaboration with Metail sets the tone for what will be a fashion week characterised by its cutting edge approach to integrating digital and social media.”

We are especially excited about this partnership: Holland came up with the inspiration after sharing the stage with Metail’s founder Tom Adeyoola at our very own London Summit earlier this year.

Reported by Fay Cowan

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“PopSugar, which owns ShopStyle, uses its content to drive traffic to the fashion shopping search engine. And to make sure that everybody leaves with everything they wanted, ShopStyle is rolling out a Universal Card that will allow consumers to to use a shopping cart with items from multiple retailers and check out in one swipe, rather than going to each retailer’s checkout.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - PopSugar Shopping Cart

Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - Fashion Crowdfunding

The most popular crowdfunding websites are those that cater to multiple industries, such as Kickstarter and Indiegogo, whose ‘Go Crowdfund Britain’ tour ended just last week. Online retail giant Alibaba also recently launched their own crowdfunding site for movies and amassed 240’000 users in the first two days alone. With their rival JD recently jumping into the space with a crowdfunding site named Coufenzi. We’ve also seen various startups emerge in the fashion space, each of which work in slightly different ways and cater to different audiences. So, what are the advantages for these smaller scale versions? We take a look at the market:

One of the first fashion crowdsourcing websites to enter the scene was Beta Brand, which predominantly features casual wear and was founded in San Francisco in 2009. It allows customers to vote for designs, when a design receives enough votes a prototype of it is manufactured. If the prototype in turn receives enough crowdfunding, it will be turned into a product that is available for purchase on-site.

The Parisian startup I Am La Mode and the New York-based Before The Label, both founded in 2012, work in a similar way. On Before The Label, customers can pre-order designs and these are then manufactured once the target amount of pre-orders have been placed. On I Am La Mode, people can back a project in exchange for a so-called pledge, which is a gift that can be related to the project, but does not have to be. While both appear to cater to women only, I Am La Mode has a high-fashion feel and Before The Label works closely with charitable organisations.

Last year saw the launch of London-based Wowcracy, BuoyUp, and Luevo. The first has partnered up with Vogue Talents to scout for new designer talent, whilst the second caps the availability of each product so as to maintain exclusivity. Like BuoyUp, Luevo also aims to help aspiring designers take off, rather than just letting anyone post individual projects.

Then there’s the recently launched French Meet My Designer, which lets people invest in projects curated by the site. If an investment target is reached, all investors receive a 20% discount on the finished collection or design, and they will also be rewarded royalties in proportion to their investment for the first three months. This self-proclaimed ‘Kickstarter for Fashion’ already features 200 designers from over 40 countries (more information about them here).

Startups and aspiring fashion designers are spoilt for choice – so the question here is, do they think they will be more successful by targeting anyone and everyone, or do they wish to reach a more selectively curated audience?

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“The company has laid off more than 150 employee in an attempt to consolidate resources globally. It’s not clear what departments were affected. As of June 2013, Coach had 18,366 employees worldwide, 3,197 of which were corporate.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - Coach
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“The designers who founded their label have quit – the latest in a line of exits which has left the pool of local talent running dry.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - Sass and Bide Founders
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