periscope

Decoded Fashion - Weekly Stories - Henry Holland
Image source: Visa Europe

It’s time to say “ta-ta” to the newly housed LFW! London Fashion Week felt refreshed in its new Soho location, with another wave of brands ensuring tech was embraced in the British fashion capital. So, who was killing it in the digital stakes this season?

Burberry’s Snap-Show

Given its track record of using tech to its advantage, it was little surprise that Burberry became the first brand to showcase its latest collection on Snapchat. Ahead of its S/S 16 show on Monday, the brand launched a featured Snapchat story that gave fans a preview of the collection on the app before it hit the runway, plus a look backstage. Models Cara Delevingne, Suki Waterhouse and Jourdan Dunn, as well as Burberry CEO Christopher Bailey, also featured in the Snapchat collection.

Hunter’s Periscope Headliners

British heritage brand Hunter opted to use Periscope in the build-up to its S/S 16 Hunter Original show. The Twitter-owned, live video-streaming app gave Hunter the opportunity to showcase the bands lined up to play at the event – including Fear of Men and Tropics – before it began, as well as some behind-the-scenes action.

It wasn’t all done with existing Hunter fans in mind, though – the brand’s creative director Alasdhair Willis told Wonderland Magazine he hoped to reach “a broader audience that might not traditionally engage with London Fashion Week”.

Topshop’s Pinterest Palettes

Clued into taking the power of fashion week beyond the catwalk, Topshop collaborated with Pinterest to create Pinterest Palettes – a collection of shoppable Pinterest boards that use technology to spot emerging colour trends on the runways.

Topshop.com customers can also use Pinterest Palettes to find their “colour DNA” by submitting one of their own Pinterest boards to the system; customers then receive personalised shopping recommendations from Topshop based on their colour preferences.

Pinterest Palettes will remain online for the duration of the remaining Fashion Weeks and will conclude on October 8.

Henry Holland’s Invisible Tech

In an interesting move, House of Holland partnered with Visa Europe Collab to create what Henry Holland dubbed “connected jewellery”. At the brand’s S/S 16 show on Saturday, costume rings embedded with NFC technology were given to VIP guests, enabling them to shop the collection directly from the front row.

When guests – including Alexa Chung and Daisy Lowe – decided they liked something on the catwalk, they could buy it instantly by sending out a signal through their jewellery. “For me, it was about making the technology invisible, so that the items are desirable pieces you’d want to wear regardless,” said Henry Holland.

IMG to Step Up London’s Tech Game

Finally, it has just been announced that IMG, the corporate brain behind many of New York Fashion Week’s best tech moments this season, has become a patron of the British Fashion Council. Expect to see bigger, better fashion-tech projects in future seasons at London Fashion Week.

Interested in who’s innovating at Fashion Week? Next month in New York, Decoded Fashion and W Magazine will launch the Fashion Futures Awards, celebrating talent across the fashion and technology industries. Find out more here.

Reported by Grace Howard

1

“Gigi, Kendall, Karlie, Kim. We’ve seen them many times since New York Fashion Week started – not only on the runway and in paparazzi shots, but also via Periscope. “

Read Article

Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - Periscope x NYFW
1

“Interested in fashion weeks? Prepare to be social media bombarded starting from tomorrow when the shows kick off for another season in New York. Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr, Snapchat (the list goes on), will all have their place, but the new app of choice looks set to be Periscope.”

Read Article

Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - Periscope x NYFW
1

“In what will be a digital first for fashion, Ralph Lauren Corp. is partnering with the live-streaming app Periscope to livestream the Ralph Lauren Collection show to the heart of London.”

Read Article

Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily -  Ralph Lauren x Periscope
1

“Twitter’s standalone app for live-streaming video, Periscope, now has nearly two million daily active users watching 40 years of broadcasts a day.”

Read Article

Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily -  Twitter x Periscope

Decoded Fashion - Weekly Stories - Gisele
Image source: AdWeek

Looking at the fashion retail landscape today, storytelling hasn’t been this fashionable since we were still being tucked into bed every night. Telling effective stories has become the key strategy for fashion brands, for whom it is now essential to negotiate the online and offline worlds with ease. Omnichannel success might mean approaching customers from all angles – digital marketing, social networking, data collection, in-store technology and point-of-sale innovation – but there’s little point if they don’t come together to tell a seamless story for your brand.

At our Autumn Milan Summit, taking place from 17-18 November, an expert panel including representatives from Mr Porter and La Repubblica will debate the art of effective storytelling. In the meantime, we take a look at the red-hot storytelling successes of the summer so far – where digital storytelling and real-life engagement are seamlessly combined for a (hopefully) happy ending.

Amazon Fashion

Once sniffed at by some in the industry, Amazon Fashion is demanding to be taken seriously as an e-tailer to be reckoned with. This summer heralded surprisingly high quarterly profits for the e-commerce giant, demonstrating that relative gambles like investing in its fashion business could be paying off.

After opening a massive photo studio in Williamsburg, Brooklyn in 2013, this summer has seen Amazon Fashion repeat the trick in London: the city’s own Amazon Fashion studio launched in Shoreditch last month. But more than an essential bricks-and-mortar powerhouse to build its fashion business – helping to create more than 500,000 images for its site every year, says Amazon – the company has leveraged the studio to emphasise the story it wants to tell.

If photos of cool girl Suki Waterhouse – the new face of Amazon Fashion – in the studio weren’t enough to convince you, the studio has already hosted a Fashion Forum event with Dazed & Confused magazine to inspire young people starting out in the industry.

Under Armour

Winner of a Cannes Lions award, the sports apparel brand Under Armour’s ‘I Will What I Want’ advertisement with supermodel Gisele Bundchen is surely the campaign of the summer.

Demonstrating an amazing use of the bad side of social media as well as the good, the video campaign sees Bundchen kicking and punching a large boxing bag with gusto. Meanwhile, real social media comments posted by the public in response to news of her signing days earlier, appear on the walls around her. Many are negative – “stick to modelling, sweetie” and “Gisele is sooooo fake” – while her workout demonstrates she has just as much right to be there as any sportswoman.

But it doesn’t just work on TV and YouTube – the campaign includes an immersive web experience, ‘Will Beats Noise’, that shows Gisele working out while real-time social commentary streams in. What’s more, the campaign has driven sales.

Catch Under Armour’s Vice President, Direct-To-Consumer, Digital, Sid Jatia speaking at our NYC Summit in October.

Burberry Snapchat & Periscope

Snapchat and Periscope offer huge scope for brands to tell unique stories that cut straight to the interested consumer on the move – but they can be difficult to negotiate. As usual, you can look to Burberry as an example of a brand that is doing the trend right.

Last month, it announced that its early moves on the apps have been a success, with a live fashion show beamed from LA and the promotion of its last menswear show through the two channels producing a record number of impressions: both topped 100 million for the first time.

You can book your ticket to the Milan Summit here.

Reported by Claire Healy

persicope

The battle of the live-streaming apps has begun: joining residing champ Meerkat in the ring is Twitter’s new Periscope app, which launched last Thursday. And, though the current battle has the big news organisations all a-flutter, the war is going to be one to win the hearts (and phones) of the fashion world.

At first glance, both apps are largely similar: live-streaming video apps, which link to the user’s Twitter account to broadcast and watch video around the world. They also both allow streamers to comment on the broadcast, view how many other people are watching at the same time and indicate their approval with a like (Meerkat) or a <3 (Periscope). With such features clearly emulating the fashion show format – event, audience, and an invitation to admire – its easy to see how the services could be utilised come next fashion week.

In the age of social media, fashion weeks have been no stranger to the concept of the live-stream. Viewing the runway in real time has been made easy through the live-streaming feeds operated by brands themselves. The new live-streaming apps on the block could revolutionise this model, however, bringing greater personalisation into the viewer’s experience – why would you watch a stream from the brand itself, when your favourite blogger is FROW and you can see exactly what they’re seeing (not just the clothes, for instance, but the shoes that other audience members are wearing)? It could also provide a helping hand to smaller up-and-coming labels that don’t yet have the funds to produce slick live-streams themselves.

So which of the apps will take the lead next fashion month? Periscope is now Twitter’s one and only, having been purchased by the microblogging site in January for a mere $100 million. And, though its early days for the young app, word on the street is that the extra features are pegging it ahead of its (albeit cuter) rival. In fact, for co-founder Keyvon Beykpour, Periscope isn’t about live-streaming at all – with greater customisation, a sleeker look and less lag time, it’s a “teleportation product.” Aiming to get past Silicon Valley jargon, Twitter’s own Head of Planning David Wilding will be on hand at our London Summit, where he will be answering any questions that fashion brands might have on the potential of live-streaming apps for the shows of the future.

Catch David Wilding, Head of Planning, Twitter at our London Summit on May 20, 2015.

Reported by Claire Healy

Image: Source