retail
1

“Is mass customization the future of retail? Maybe. Technology definitely makes the idea a lot closer to reality. Mass customization isn’t something new, but it’s something that has been recently reinvented by creative startup ventures. Custom clothes in have always been the ideal choice for trendsetters and forward thinkers. “

Read Article

Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily -  Retail Customization
1

“Despite a growing number of direct-to-consumer brands, brick-and-mortar shopping still accounts for 94 percent of retail sales in the U.S. That’s why Storefront, a startup that provides brands with temporary retail space, is launching RetailGrade, a new tool that makes reaching these offline shoppers a lot more straightforward.”

Read Article

Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily -  Storefront x RetailGrade

Decoded Fashion - Weekly Stories - JL FOUND
Image source: John Lewis FOUND

This week has seen some of the UK’s most traditional retail institutions throw their hats into the in-store technology ring. At 131-year-old retailer Jaeger, CIO Cathy McCabe promised a front-to-back IT revolution in stores – including kitting out staff with iPads to enable them to take payments from customers anywhere on the shop floor. Meanwhile in Birmingham, John Lewis will be trialling a new lifestyle store concept called Found. It will curate lifestyle collections across fashion, homeware and technology – aiming to bring a younger, more stylish audience into stores with a targeted lifestyle ‘edit’.

By making in-store technology their chosen driver for change, both retailers are clearly attempting to get beyond gimmicks in favour of bigger profits. But can the latest in-store tech really drive sales? This question (alongside many others) will be posed at our NYC Summit on 28-29 October, where a dedicated panel will debate how we can optimise in-store tech to create retail concepts of the future.

The matter of whether it can be a true revenue driver has been on many minds at bricks-and-mortar stores in the past year. The most famous investors in this space in the luxury fashion market have been big-name brands like Burberry, Kate Spade and Karl Lagerfeld. The latter, for instance, has deployed in-store tech in all its outlets, such as iPad minis integrated into display racks and fitting rooms equipped with fun photobooths – you can even add a Karl-inspired filter and share on social media.

Start-ups getting in on the action include Perch, an experiential media technology that makes physical displays more immersive – in other words, the display table becomes an interactive digital screen. According to Mary Beech, CMO at Kate Spade, there’s a higher sell-through for products on Perch tables. Other brands that have partnered with Perch include Levi’s, Nordstrom and Estee Lauder.

But there’s also evidence that certain customers feel overwhelmed by the presence of too much technology in their real-life shopping trips. While facial recognition tech could be employed to give individuals more age-appropriate beauty recommendations, for instance, 68% of UK shoppers would find that “creepy” (source: RichRelevance). But that’s no reason not to experiment. The future for more easily digestible in-store technology could lie in lifestyle concepts within larger retail institutions, such as John Lewis’s new Found space.

Retailers’ best bet may be to take cues from lifestyle e-tailers like Warby Parker and Bonobos – stores that, in their model for using technology to create a better fit and lower price for customers, have been huge e-commerce successes. Moreover, both brands have now been able to open physical spaces directly informed by the shopping patterns of a younger customer, rather than trying to anticipate their desires with a random selection of technology gimmicks. Either way, in-store technology is a space that’s bound to make for some trial-and-error success stories in the next year.

Book your ticket for the Decoded Fashion NYC Summit here.

Reported by Claire Healy

“When a multibrand retailer launches an in-house line, it enters with a wealth of knowledge about the shopping habits and preferences of its existing customers — that’s one of the reasons retailers like to do it, alongside promises of thicker profit margins.”

Read Article

Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - Modcloth

Decoded Fashion - Weekly Stories - Warhol
Image source: TOG, Sao Paulo

Brazilian custom furniture brand Tog has unveiled its first bricks-and-mortar showroom in Sao Paulo with a mixed-use space conceived as part showroom, part social hub to boost in-store dwell time and attract a wider creative following.

Prolific French super-designer Philippe Starck and Sao Paulo-based architects Triptyque, who designed the space, drew inspiration from US pop artist Andy Warhol’s famous 60s-era New York studio The Factory – an infamous creative hangout renowned for its parties and artists’ gatherings. Spanning 22,604 sq ft and spread across three floors, the multipurpose flagship features a showroom, a warehouse, offices, an events space and a home-inspired fusion restaurant. Headed by local chef Renata Vanzetto, it features mismatched furniture, Persian rugs and plants.

Beyond the emphasis on sociability, flexibility is also a critical part of the strategic redesign. Based in a former industrial building, the store is painted white, providing a contrasting backdrop for Tog’s vibrantly coloured products. There also no partition walls – making the space easily adaptable for other uses such as music events.

Guest post Stylus.com by Marta PodeszwaKatie Baron

“Digital will touch more than half of European retail transactions over the next five years, says a new Forrester report – and nowhere more so than in the UK market.”

Read Article

Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily -  Seamless Cross Channel


Frank & Oak, Montreal

Canadian menswear e-tailer Frank and Oak has launched ‘In my City’ – a two-week online campaign designed to bring six, long-term bricks-and-mortar pop-up stores to locations across the US. Taking its cues from well-known crowdfunding sites such as Kickstarter, the brand is asking US fans to cast a vote for their preferred destinations – but not without the rather unusual step of first ‘investing’ in the company. Consumers can only vote by ‘backing’ their request with the purchase of a gift card.

Via a dedicated microsite dubbed Collective Impact, ‘backers’ may choose from six different price levels – ranging from $10 to $3,000 – which are then processed as gift cards. More money doesn’t equate to more of a say on where the store is launched, but it does garner bigger rewards when it does. Investments of more than $50 warrant rewards packages/bonuses such as a free tote bag, the chance to attend a store’s opening event, dinner with the founders, or a trip to the brand’s HQ in Montreal. If the store doesn’t open in their preferred city, the gift card amount is refunded to the backer.

The strategy has garnered interest from some consumers (at the time of writing, Manhattan had 269 backers versus 22 for Seattle – equating to $14,830 and $1,130, respectively). However, it may risk alienating future consumers and potential ‘light-touch advocates/influencers’ – consumers who are interested in engaging with the brand, but resent the need to make a purchase before the brand entertains their opinion.

Echoing the brand’s six existing pop-up stores in Canada, each outlet promises to run for 12-18 months. This gives visitors not only the opportunity to try on and see products up-close, but also to connect with the creative community via talks, lessons, and other in-store events.

Guest post Stylus.com by Alison Gough, Editor & Katie Baron, Head of Retail

Trading on social media to attract millennial consumers, British footwear brand Clarks is tapping popular instant messaging service WhatsApp for a multimedia campaign celebrating the 65th anniversary of its iconic desert boot.

Dubbed ‘From Rats to Rudeboys’, the campaign launches on April 13. Messages containing images, videos and playlists will be sent directly to WhatsApp users who have opted in to the initiative, having been prompted by teaser films currently being posted on Clarks’ social media platforms, including Instagram and Twitter. To gain access to the material, users simply add an 11-digit number to their in-app contacts list. On sign-up, they will also be sent an additional video introducing late British designer and founder of the Clarks desert boot, Nathan Clark.

The main focus of the material is to explain the brand’s affiliation with key cultural, music and style movements of the past 65 years, such as the birth of dancehall music in Jamaica in the 70s, and the 60s UK mod scene (see also Fred Perry Store Harnesses Heritage and Music Meets Retail). However, there will also be content from three contemporary creatives: British reggae historian and former mod Steve Barrow (known for wearing sharp tweed suits with his desert boots), French photographer Bruno Barbey (whose photos of riots in Paris in 1968 show students wearing Clarks shoes), and Jah Stitch, Jamaican musician and member of 70s Kingston gang, The Spanglers.

As part of a wider mission to elevate consumer perception of the brand, in June 2015, Clarks will also unveil an interactive digital piece at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum, dubbed Clarks Unboxed. It forms part of the museum’s summer exhibition, Shoes: Pleasure & Pain, which examines the cultural significance of shoes.

Guest post Stylus.com by Samantha Fox, EditorKatie Baron, Head of Retail

1

“In today’s landscape, where the blur between online and offline is the new normal for consumers, building a successful brick-and-mortar experience requires retailers to rethink how to make digital a core aspect of their physical stores. Mobile is the go-to technology to help bridge that gap. “

Read Article

elizabeth-georgia-may-jagger-juergen-teller-sonia-rykiel-2015-1

When it comes to global luxury groups, it can be hard to see past the endless sparring between the industry’s biggest players, KERING and LVMH. But with the burst of digital making its presence felt from East to West, the current marketplace is more open than you might think. Today, a number of newer groups are vying for attention – and, with some big acquisitions and unique strategy under their belts, 2015 could be the year you hear less from KERING and LVMH and more from some of the following names.

First Heritage Brands Limited Paris

Headed up by Jean-Marc Loubier, First Heritage Brands is the investment arm of the Fung group which oversees shoemaker Robert Clergerie and luxury leather brand Delvaux. The aim, for the Hong Kong based Fung Group, was to invest in established European luxury houses in need of a boost – and, in tandem, to develop their international potential back home in China. First Heritage was behind the recently relaunched Sonia Rykiel, with its new artistic director and fresh look.

Cheil Industries Fashion Division Seoul

Seoul-based Cheil Industries might have a domestic focus, but that’s no reason to underestimate this leading investor. At the helm is Lee Seo-Hyun, the daughter of Samsung’s chairman and powerful, Parsons school-educated businesswoman in her own right. South Korean brands to watch under the Cheil umbrella include Juun J, Beanpole and 8 Seconds, while the recently acquired Italian crocodile handbag house Colombo Via Della Spiga demonstrates the group’s international ambitions.

Labelux

Famous for its portfolio of iconic British luxury brands, Labelux was integrated into the JAB Holding Company in July 2014. Originally founded in 2007, the progressive group boasts well-known lifestyle brands rooted in leather goods and accessories – think Jimmy Choo, Bally, Belstaff and Zagliani.

Come May, Labelux Group Multichannel Director Harriet Williams and Bally’s Global eCommerce Director, Kirsty Garrish will be speaking at our London Summit about omnichannel strategy – to find out how seamlessly blur digital and retail, catch their talk on the 20th.

1 2 3 7