snapchat

Decoded Fashion - Weekly Stories - Henry Holland
Image source: Visa Europe

It’s time to say “ta-ta” to the newly housed LFW! London Fashion Week felt refreshed in its new Soho location, with another wave of brands ensuring tech was embraced in the British fashion capital. So, who was killing it in the digital stakes this season?

Burberry’s Snap-Show

Given its track record of using tech to its advantage, it was little surprise that Burberry became the first brand to showcase its latest collection on Snapchat. Ahead of its S/S 16 show on Monday, the brand launched a featured Snapchat story that gave fans a preview of the collection on the app before it hit the runway, plus a look backstage. Models Cara Delevingne, Suki Waterhouse and Jourdan Dunn, as well as Burberry CEO Christopher Bailey, also featured in the Snapchat collection.

Hunter’s Periscope Headliners

British heritage brand Hunter opted to use Periscope in the build-up to its S/S 16 Hunter Original show. The Twitter-owned, live video-streaming app gave Hunter the opportunity to showcase the bands lined up to play at the event – including Fear of Men and Tropics – before it began, as well as some behind-the-scenes action.

It wasn’t all done with existing Hunter fans in mind, though – the brand’s creative director Alasdhair Willis told Wonderland Magazine he hoped to reach “a broader audience that might not traditionally engage with London Fashion Week”.

Topshop’s Pinterest Palettes

Clued into taking the power of fashion week beyond the catwalk, Topshop collaborated with Pinterest to create Pinterest Palettes – a collection of shoppable Pinterest boards that use technology to spot emerging colour trends on the runways.

Topshop.com customers can also use Pinterest Palettes to find their “colour DNA” by submitting one of their own Pinterest boards to the system; customers then receive personalised shopping recommendations from Topshop based on their colour preferences.

Pinterest Palettes will remain online for the duration of the remaining Fashion Weeks and will conclude on October 8.

Henry Holland’s Invisible Tech

In an interesting move, House of Holland partnered with Visa Europe Collab to create what Henry Holland dubbed “connected jewellery”. At the brand’s S/S 16 show on Saturday, costume rings embedded with NFC technology were given to VIP guests, enabling them to shop the collection directly from the front row.

When guests – including Alexa Chung and Daisy Lowe – decided they liked something on the catwalk, they could buy it instantly by sending out a signal through their jewellery. “For me, it was about making the technology invisible, so that the items are desirable pieces you’d want to wear regardless,” said Henry Holland.

IMG to Step Up London’s Tech Game

Finally, it has just been announced that IMG, the corporate brain behind many of New York Fashion Week’s best tech moments this season, has become a patron of the British Fashion Council. Expect to see bigger, better fashion-tech projects in future seasons at London Fashion Week.

Interested in who’s innovating at Fashion Week? Next month in New York, Decoded Fashion and W Magazine will launch the Fashion Futures Awards, celebrating talent across the fashion and technology industries. Find out more here.

Reported by Grace Howard

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“One-hundred million users view up to four billion videos a day on Snapchat — and Burberry wants in on the action.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - Burberry x Snapchat x NYFW
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“A product of Disney’s first-ever accelerator program already getting 3.8 billion Snapchat views a month. Grabbing and holding the attention of millennial consumers can be tough, even for established brands.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily -  Naritiv

Decoded Fashion - Weekly Stories - Gisele
Image source: AdWeek

Looking at the fashion retail landscape today, storytelling hasn’t been this fashionable since we were still being tucked into bed every night. Telling effective stories has become the key strategy for fashion brands, for whom it is now essential to negotiate the online and offline worlds with ease. Omnichannel success might mean approaching customers from all angles – digital marketing, social networking, data collection, in-store technology and point-of-sale innovation – but there’s little point if they don’t come together to tell a seamless story for your brand.

At our Autumn Milan Summit, taking place from 17-18 November, an expert panel including representatives from Mr Porter and La Repubblica will debate the art of effective storytelling. In the meantime, we take a look at the red-hot storytelling successes of the summer so far – where digital storytelling and real-life engagement are seamlessly combined for a (hopefully) happy ending.

Amazon Fashion

Once sniffed at by some in the industry, Amazon Fashion is demanding to be taken seriously as an e-tailer to be reckoned with. This summer heralded surprisingly high quarterly profits for the e-commerce giant, demonstrating that relative gambles like investing in its fashion business could be paying off.

After opening a massive photo studio in Williamsburg, Brooklyn in 2013, this summer has seen Amazon Fashion repeat the trick in London: the city’s own Amazon Fashion studio launched in Shoreditch last month. But more than an essential bricks-and-mortar powerhouse to build its fashion business – helping to create more than 500,000 images for its site every year, says Amazon – the company has leveraged the studio to emphasise the story it wants to tell.

If photos of cool girl Suki Waterhouse – the new face of Amazon Fashion – in the studio weren’t enough to convince you, the studio has already hosted a Fashion Forum event with Dazed & Confused magazine to inspire young people starting out in the industry.

Under Armour

Winner of a Cannes Lions award, the sports apparel brand Under Armour’s ‘I Will What I Want’ advertisement with supermodel Gisele Bundchen is surely the campaign of the summer.

Demonstrating an amazing use of the bad side of social media as well as the good, the video campaign sees Bundchen kicking and punching a large boxing bag with gusto. Meanwhile, real social media comments posted by the public in response to news of her signing days earlier, appear on the walls around her. Many are negative – “stick to modelling, sweetie” and “Gisele is sooooo fake” – while her workout demonstrates she has just as much right to be there as any sportswoman.

But it doesn’t just work on TV and YouTube – the campaign includes an immersive web experience, ‘Will Beats Noise’, that shows Gisele working out while real-time social commentary streams in. What’s more, the campaign has driven sales.

Catch Under Armour’s Vice President, Direct-To-Consumer, Digital, Sid Jatia speaking at our NYC Summit in October.

Burberry Snapchat & Periscope

Snapchat and Periscope offer huge scope for brands to tell unique stories that cut straight to the interested consumer on the move – but they can be difficult to negotiate. As usual, you can look to Burberry as an example of a brand that is doing the trend right.

Last month, it announced that its early moves on the apps have been a success, with a live fashion show beamed from LA and the promotion of its last menswear show through the two channels producing a record number of impressions: both topped 100 million for the first time.

You can book your ticket to the Milan Summit here.

Reported by Claire Healy

“IT’S A SNAP: Hearst is in the process of developing a new product with Snapchat, WWD has learned. Luke Crisell, who was hired by Hearst’s digital arm about six month ago to work on special projects, heads up the project. Crisell, a former editor in chief of fashion company Aritzia, is said to bring an e-commerce element to the Hearst/ Snapchat product, sources say. The new special projects guru has been interviewing fashion market editors to join his team, adding to the e-commerce speculation.”

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“Everlane, the fashion brand with a mission of radical transparency in the factory and design studio, takes their social media seriously. As a web-only retailer, Everlane has garnered a dedicated following across their various platforms. Recently, the company (like a number of startups) has placed ephemeral messaging service Snapchat at the heart of their marketing strategy.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily -  SnapChat x Everlane

Decoded Fashion - Weekly Stories - Cosign
Image source: cosign.co

While 2014 saw every social network going integrate advertising into their design – notably, even Instagram and Snapchat users saw promoted content introduced into their daily browse – it seemed that the worlds of e-commerce and social networks still hadn’t fully hit it off. The year to come might just change all that, in 2015 the key for retailers will be striking the right balance between all channels- whilst engaging their audience, and hitting the right KPIs. Brands take heed, in this brave new world of social commerce, #hashtags just aren’t going to cut it.

One recent development that may prove a challenge to brands is Facebook’s policy change with regards brand visibility. The days when having a large following on your brand’s page was enough are long gone – instead, Facebook is encouraging brands to use its paid social ads, meaning that organic posts won’t be able to reach fans in the same way. In a tentative e-commerce push, Facebook and Twitter even began testing “buy” buttons this year (Decoded Fashion reported); Burberry was one of the first big-name brands to sign up to Twitter’s service, allowing users to buy products without leaving the Twitter platform at all.

The ones to watch may be image-based social media platforms such as Pinterest – combining scale and niche at the same time, the highly engaged, predominantly female audience should be where fashion brands look to bring their social spending. On Jan 1st, Pinterest announced that it would open its Promoted Pins advertising to all marketers. Brands such as Gap, and Target have already been experimenting with promoted pins. Through the ‘do-it-yourself’ advertising service, brands can bid to appear alongside search results and – key to the ‘pin-board’ aesthetic – within feeds dedicated to specific niche categories.

As Twitter and Pinterest’s advertising potential shows, harnessing user’s online beyond a mere ‘Like’ will be key to ROI in 2015. Indeed, some brands are creating their own micro platforms that, incorporating aspects of platforms such as Instagram, are spearheading social commerce on their own terms. The ASOS As Seen On Me gallery, for example, allows users to share photos on their usual social sites wearing ASOS products and tag them #asseenonme. ASOS’s stand-alone site then displays the user-generated images in a Pinterest-styled gallery, linking out to the relevant products for an ultra-quick sales conversion. You can also directly ‘shop the look’ on Topshop’s #topshopstyle platform- whether such a model works as well for luxury fashion brands is harder to tell.

Another way to incentivize social sharing that might gain a foothold in the luxury fashion world is to financially reward consumers for featuring and tagging products in social media posts. Companies such as CoSign (currently in Beta) and Stylebored allow users to accrue points for views and likes, which they can then cash in for gift cards, prizes or even a percentage of commission for sending a consumer directly to a retailer through their social network. Monetizing users’ social influence in this way might sound slightly terrifying – we’ve all got that ‘personally branded’ friend who has 3000+ Facebook friends, right? – But it could work well for mid-range designer fashion. Bloomingdales, Nordstrom and Swarovski have signed up to CoSign, while Donna Karan and Belstaff are betting on StyleBored. In what is looking more and more like a ‘pay-to-play’ social world, neat innovations such as these- are getting closer to the user’s organic posting practices than ever –suggest that this could play a huge part in social commerce success in 2015.

For more on social ROI, join us at Twitter’s London HQ for our first #DFMeetup of 2015.

Reported by Claire Healy

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“Snapchat secretly acquired a company working on a Google Glass type of product earlier this year, according to documents that leaked as a part of the Sony hacking.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - Epiphany Eyewear
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“Snapchat, the startup that raised money this year at around a $10 billion valuation without any revenue, will start making money from advertising soon.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - Snapchat
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“The Wall Street Journal reports that the three-year-old startup has created a new service called Snapchat Discovery, which will make room for everything from paid advertisements to movie clips and news articles (all disappearing, of course). Snapchat hasn’t confirmed the feature’s release, but according to WSJ’s source, the company has been in talks with at least a dozen media companies, including MailOnline.”

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Decoded Fashion - Fashion Tech Daily - Evan Spiegel